Summary

Sung in New York City's Cafe Society sixteen years before Rosa Parks refused to yield her seat on a Montgomery bus, and throughout the country afterwards, the ballad Strange Fruit is considered by many to be Billie Holiday's most controversial and politically charged performance, as well as the first significant lyric protest against the racial lynchings in the South.

Strange Fruit: The Biography of a Song by Vanity Fair contributing editor David Margolick takes the reader on a journey of song, singer, and songwriter. The book captures the story of ongoing racial injustice in 1930s America and the struggle for civil rights in subsequent years, in which the song Strange Fruit played an important but heretofore largely unrecognized role.

Strange Fruit parallels the lives of two distinctly different personalities: Billie Holiday, a triumphant black jazz legend constantly fighting the demons of drugs, alcohol, and spousal abuse; and Abel Meeropol (a.k.a. "Lewis Allen"), a white, Jewish schoolteacher and communist sympathizer from the Bronx who is better remembered for adopting the orphaned sons of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg than for the song that many critics consider to be Holiday's most distinctive signature tune. It also traces the enormous, life-changing impact that the song Strange Fruit has had over later generations of fans, black and white, unknown and famous, including performers like Lena Horne, Bobby Short, Eartha Kitt, Pete Seeger, Tori Amos, Cassandra Wilson, Natalie Merchant, and Sting.

About the Author

David Margolick is a contributing editor for Vanity Fair and the former National Legal Affairs Editor for the New York Times. A four-time Pulitzer Prize nominee, he is a graduate of the University of Michigan and Stanford Law School. He is the author of Undue Influence: The Epic Battle For the Johnson & Johnson Fortune and At the Bar: The Passions and Peccadillos of American Lawyers.

Product Details

  • Format Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Ecco
  • Music / History & Criticism

Summary

Sung in New York City's Cafe Society sixteen years before Rosa Parks refused to yield her seat on a Montgomery bus, and throughout the country afterwards, the ballad Strange Fruit is considered by many to be Billie Holiday's most controversial and politically charged performance, as well as the first significant lyric protest against the racial lynchings in the South.

Strange Fruit: The Biography of a Song by Vanity Fair contributing editor David Margolick takes the reader on a journey of song, singer, and songwriter. The book captures the story of ongoing racial injustice in 1930s America and the struggle for civil rights in subsequent years, in which the song Strange Fruit played an important but heretofore largely unrecognized role.

Strange Fruit parallels the lives of two distinctly different personalities: Billie Holiday, a triumphant black jazz legend constantly fighting the demons of drugs, alcohol, and spousal abuse; and Abel Meeropol (a.k.a. "Lewis Allen"), a white, Jewish schoolteacher and communist sympathizer from the Bronx who is better remembered for adopting the orphaned sons of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg than for the song that many critics consider to be Holiday's most distinctive signature tune. It also traces the enormous, life-changing impact that the song Strange Fruit has had over later generations of fans, black and white, unknown and famous, including performers like Lena Horne, Bobby Short, Eartha Kitt, Pete Seeger, Tori Amos, Cassandra Wilson, Natalie Merchant, and Sting.

About the Author

David Margolick is a contributing editor for Vanity Fair and the former National Legal Affairs Editor for the New York Times. A four-time Pulitzer Prize nominee, he is a graduate of the University of Michigan and Stanford Law School. He is the author of Undue Influence: The Epic Battle For the Johnson & Johnson Fortune and At the Bar: The Passions and Peccadillos of American Lawyers.

Product Details

  • Format Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Ecco
  • Music / History & Criticism
9780060959562

Details

Format: Book
Label: ECCC
Rel. Date: 01/05/2001
UPC: 9780060959562

Strange Fruit: The Biography of a Song
Format: Book
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Summary

Sung in New York City's Cafe Society sixteen years before Rosa Parks refused to yield her seat on a Montgomery bus, and throughout the country afterwards, the ballad Strange Fruit is considered by many to be Billie Holiday's most controversial and politically charged performance, as well as the first significant lyric protest against the racial lynchings in the South.

Strange Fruit: The Biography of a Song by Vanity Fair contributing editor David Margolick takes the reader on a journey of song, singer, and songwriter. The book captures the story of ongoing racial injustice in 1930s America and the struggle for civil rights in subsequent years, in which the song Strange Fruit played an important but heretofore largely unrecognized role.

Strange Fruit parallels the lives of two distinctly different personalities: Billie Holiday, a triumphant black jazz legend constantly fighting the demons of drugs, alcohol, and spousal abuse; and Abel Meeropol (a.k.a. "Lewis Allen"), a white, Jewish schoolteacher and communist sympathizer from the Bronx who is better remembered for adopting the orphaned sons of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg than for the song that many critics consider to be Holiday's most distinctive signature tune. It also traces the enormous, life-changing impact that the song Strange Fruit has had over later generations of fans, black and white, unknown and famous, including performers like Lena Horne, Bobby Short, Eartha Kitt, Pete Seeger, Tori Amos, Cassandra Wilson, Natalie Merchant, and Sting.

About the Author

David Margolick is a contributing editor for Vanity Fair and the former National Legal Affairs Editor for the New York Times. A four-time Pulitzer Prize nominee, he is a graduate of the University of Michigan and Stanford Law School. He is the author of Undue Influence: The Epic Battle For the Johnson & Johnson Fortune and At the Bar: The Passions and Peccadillos of American Lawyers.

Product Details

  • Format Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Ecco
  • Music / History & Criticism