746105022829
Where You Want To Be

Details

Format: CD
Label: VICTORY
Catalog: 228
Genre: Rock/Pop
Rel. Date: 07/27/2004
UPC: 746105022829

Where You Want To Be
Artist: Taking Back Sunday
Format: CD
New: In Stock $11.98
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''Where You Want to Be'' is the second album by Taking Back Sunday. It was released on July 27 2004. It is a follow-up to their first effort, ''Tell All Your Friends''. The album was originally titled ''Make It Your Business''. It is the first album to feature guitarist Fred Mascherino. "This Photograph Is Proof (I Know You Know)" appeared on the Spider-Man 2 Soundtrack.

The title of the album came from the song "Set Phasers to Stun", in which the phrase is featured.

One song that was recorded during the ''Where You Want to Be'' sessions (titled "Follow the Format") leaked beforehand over the internet. This inevitably led to the band's decision not to include it on the album, much to the dismay of many fans. Instead, the bonus track featured on import versions of the album was a re-recorded version of the previously released "Your Own Disaster". - Wikipedia

Emo. Warped Tour. Victory Records. Long Island scene. If these words cause your gag reflex to quiver, stay away from Taking Back Sunday. Far, far away. But if new school emotional hardcore is what fogs up your horn-rims, you won't find purer practitioners anyplace. TBS became confessional punk's reigning underground kings on the strength of their 2002 debut Tell All Your Friends, as well as constant touring. Despite changes in the band's lineup, Where You Want to Be picks up exactly where Friends left off, with frontman Adam Lazzara yelling over the pounding rhythm and choppy guitars of the opening song "Set Phasers to Stun." The first words out of his mouth are "I'm sorry," and you can guess what follows: eleven tracks of apologies, pleas, disses and cathartic admissions destined to be quoted in thousands of IM profiles. The pronouns "I" and "you" appear multiple times in every song, as Lazzara chronicles failed relationships in a yelp so tortured, he sounds on the verge of tears or a nervous breakdown with each syllable. Only on the sickly-sweet acoustic ballad "New American Classic" and the soaring single "A Decade Under the Influence" (which swipes a melody from the Cure's "In Between Days") does Lazzara lighten up and actually sing. Not that his screaming is a bad thing; on the contrary, it's what makes Taking Back Sunday's thundering choruses so anthemic. As the closing "Slowdance on the Inside" fades out with "tonight won't make a difference" being shouted into the void, it's easy to imagine an army of misfit teenagers raising their voices to join in. "Emo. Warped Tour. Victory Records. Long Island scene. If these words cause your gag reflex to quiver, stay away from Taking Back Sunday. Far, far away. But if new school emotional hardcore is what fogs up your horn-rims, you won't find purer practitioners anyplace. TBS became confessional punk's reigning underground kings on the strength of their 2002 debut Tell All Your Friends, as well as constant touring. Despite changes in the band's lineup, Where You Want to Be picks up exactly where Friends left off, with frontman Adam Lazzara yelling over the pounding rhythm and choppy guitars of the opening song ""Set Phasers to Stun."" The first words out of his mouth are ""I'm sorry,"" and you can guess what follows: eleven tracks of apologies, pleas, disses and cathartic admissions destined to be quoted in thousands of IM profiles. The pronouns ""I"" and ""you"" appear multiple times in every song, as Lazzara chronicles failed relationships in a yelp so tortured, he sounds on the verge of tears or a nervous breakdown with each syllable. Only on the sickly-sweet acoustic ballad ""New American Classic"" and the soaring single ""A Decade Under the Influence"" (which swipes a melody from the Cure's ""In Between Days"") does Lazzara lighten up and actually sing. Not that his screaming is a bad thing; on the contrary, it's what makes Taking Back Sunday's thundering choruses so anthemic. As the closing ""Slowdance on the Inside"" fades out with ""tonight won't make a difference"" being shouted into the void, it's easy to imagine an army of misfit teenagers raising their voices to join in. "